The Core

Laid Off? How to Land a New Job
by Robin Ryan

Losing your job is one of the more stressful events that life can bring. Everyone hates those feelings of rejection, and has fear that you might not get another job, or be paid as well as before. Two major mistakes you need to avoid are, first, don’t badmouth or burn your bridges with the employer letting you go. Second, don’t immediately race to call everyone you know asking if they have a job you can apply for.  You need to engage a hiring strategy and good action plan to be successful.  Here’s how to get started.

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Thinking About Going Green?

Whether you're a student, a career seeker, or currently employed and looking for other opportunities, it's hard to ignore the emergence of "green careers." Getting in on the ground floor of this promising field is a top priority for professionals looking for growth areas in a halted economy. President Obama's new stimulus package includes $16.8 billion in renewable energy-related industries which include the fields of solar energy, wind farming, architecture, mass transit, and engineering. With this infusion of attention and resources, which sectors of the green industry are likely to grow? Here are green career opportunities to consider if you're thinking of making the leap to this new, exciting frontier.

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Do What You Are: Discover the Perfect Career for You Through the Secrets of Personality Type
by Paul D. Tieger and Barbara Barron

The fact that someone's personality type can be unknown to them illustrates the need for the book Do What You Are. Getting to know yourself is one of the fastest routes to self-discovery. Most of the book is devoted to determining the reader's Meyers-Briggs (MBTI) type and then delving into what it means in terms of selecting a career. Whether you are just launching your career search or looking to switch careers as a seasoned professional, Do What You Are will help you dig down and discover traits that will illuminate a suitable career direction.

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Q. How many times is too many times to try to contact a potential employer? I've been submitting my resume to every job I can find, but I'm not getting any feedback at all. Even a "no" would be better than silence. I've tried repeatedly to call to follow-up, but I'm not sure where to draw the line between persistence and stalker.

A. This is the kind of question that really depends on the individual employers. Some employers will be impressed by your persistence and follow-through. Some will be bothered by constant calls. Understand that employers are busy and that hiring somebody is frequently not their primary task. It can take a while for them to get through a stack of resumes, and even then, they may not have time to respond to everybody. At a minimum, you should be safe making a follow-up call immediately after submitting your resume. If you have an e-mail address, then after a short time, you can also try to send a follow-up e-mail to reaffirm your interest and emphasize some other aspect of your experience as it relates to the position they're attempting to fill. If you know somebody in the company, and can work through them to get feedback on your status, or better, if you were able to submit your resume through them, then that opens a few more contact opportunities.


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Associates of the Month

Congratulations to our Outstanding Associates this Month!

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